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Teen convicted of disorderly conduct for using iPad to record bullies tormenting him | The Raw Story

thingspeopleasklibrarians:

ekimsal:

socialismartnature:

This country is the fucking worst. As the world’s biggest bully-nation, it’s no wonder that our society literally encourages kids to bully the most vulnerable among themselves … and then punishes the victim if they try to resist …

===

A Pennsylvania mother whose learning-disabled son was convicted of disorderly conduct for recording his bullies while they tormented him demanded the judge reverse decision and the school district apologize.

Shea Love wondered why the school district contacted the police to discuss a violation of wiretap statutes instead of confronting the students who were bullying her son, a sophomore at South Fayette High School with attention deficit and an anxiety disorder.

“The whole thing has been a horrible nightmare,” Love told the Tribune-Review. “This whole ordeal has made my son miserable.”

On the recording — which the 15-year-old made on his iPad — one student can be heard telling another to pull Love’s son’s pants down. The teacher can be heard intervening, telling the students that they need to stop talking if their discussion isn’t about math.

A few minutes later, a loud slam can be heard, followed by the teacher telling students to sit down. “What? I was just trying to scare him,” one of the boys can be heard saying.

The 15-year-old said he made the recording “because I always felt like it wasn’t me being heard.”

“I wanted some help,” he continued. “This wasn’t just a one-time thing. This always happens every day in that class.”

Upon learning of the recording, South Fayette High School principal Scott Milburn and assistant principal Aaron Skrbin contacted Lieutenant Robert Kurta, asking that he come to the school because he believed there had been “a wiretapping incident.”

School district officials forced the student to erase the recording and ordered him to attend Saturday detention. Kurta charged him with disorderly conduct, but didn’t believe that the incident warranted a felony wiretapping charge, though according to court records, he was adamant the student had “committed a crime.”

South Fayette District Judge Maureen McGraw-Desmet found the student guilty, fined him $25 and ordered him to pay court costs.

What a surprise, something shitty and awful coming out of Pennsylvania.

This is the webpage of the school district. The contact information for the principal and vice principal can be located there. http://www.southfayette.org/Page/782

descentintotyranny:

LAPD Officers Removed Antennas from Police Cars in Black Areas to Disable Recording Devices

Apr. 8 2014

Los Angeles police officers removed antennas from police cars in several predominantly Black neighborhoods to disable the recording equipment and avoid being monitored while on duty, according to an inspection by LAPD investigators.

The department review found about half of the 80 cars in the Southeast division—which includes Watts and the Jordan Downs and Nickerson Gardens housing projects—were missing the antennas that help capture what officers say in the field. The review discovered at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions also had antennas removed.

Members of the Police Commission, which oversees the department, said they were alarmed by both the actions of the officers and the failure of the department to reveal their actions when they were first detected.

“On an issue like this, we need to be brought in right away,” commission President Steve Soboroff told the Los Angeles Times. “This equipment is for the protection of the public and of the officers. To have people who don’t like the rules to take it upon themselves to do something like this is very troubling.”

But LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said the department did not purposely try to hide the matter from the commission and pointed out that he has always been a strong advocate of the recording devices. LAPD officials decided it would be futile to try to figure out which officers were responsible for removing the antennas, since so many of them use the cars during their shifts. Instead the department warned officers about removing the antennas and put checks in place to account for the equipment at the start and end of each patrol shift.

One of the main reasons a federal judge agreed to lift the Department of Justice’s oversight of the notoriously corrupt LAPD last year, after more than a decade, was because of safeguards such as the cameras.

The cameras turn on automatically whenever an officer activates the car’s emergency lights and sirens or can be activated manually. They are used to record traffic stops and other encounters that occur in front of the vehicle.

In addition, officers wear small transmitters on their belts that relay their voices back to the antennas in the patrol car. Sgt. Dan Gomez, a department expert on recording devices, told the Times that regardless of whether they are in front of the camera, officers’ voices can be recorded hundreds of yards away from the car—but that distance is severely curtailed by as much as a third without the antennas.

Ben Carson Says He Was Asked To Apologize For Speech 'Offending' Obama

Shorter Ben Carson:

"I made statements that were intended to offend the President. So I was surprised that anyone was offended. And surprised that he stayed calm.”

By the way, isn’t it customary in American politics to demand an apology for the slightest thing? Oh wait, I forgot, only Democrats apologize.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross
Juvenile in Justice
1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.
2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.
3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.
4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.
5. 
6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.
7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.
8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.
9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.
10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.
Zoom Info

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross

Juvenile in Justice

1. I got kicked out of school for partying and truancy. I use meth. They have had me here for two weeks. I think they keep me here because they think I am a risk of hurting myself. When they want to come in, they come in, they don’t knock or anything — this is the observation room. There are five other girls here I think for things like running away and curfew violations…lewd and lascivious conduct, selling meth, robbery, weed… stuff like that. —C.T., age 15 Southwest Idaho Juvenile Detention Center, Caldwell, Idaho.

2. I am a transgender female. They have me living in an isolation area for the past seven months I think to protect me against suicide, but also keep me sort of away from the other girls. I live on the street with older friends who are part of “that life.” They’re mostly people who are positive about who I am but also got involved in stuff like burglary, drugs, and prostitution. I don’t mind being separate from the other girls, but I miss the interaction. —A.S., age 17 Hawaii Youth Correctional Facility (HYCF), Kailua, Hawaii.

3. I have two more days here, or less, then I go to an adult facility. I was convicted (with several co-defenders) of killing one of my friends’ mother. I was 16, and it was a series of events — bad peer pressure and alcohol. The oldest of my friends — co-conspirators — was convicted on four counts. He was over 18 at the time so he was convicted as an adult. He has successfully appealed three of the convictions and had them overturned. He’s waiting for the results of the last appeal. I’m the only one out of the four kids involved that received life without parole. I want to apply for clemency but can’t find an attorney that would take it pro bono. I don’t have the money for an appeal. I thought I might get 30 years to life but ended up with life without parole. I was convicted right after Measure 11 passed, from a small town where they wanted to set an example of how to punish juveniles. It appears that the Department of Corrections has become the Department of Punishment. We went to Canada and were at the border in a stolen car after we planned for about four or five hours how to kill the mother. We fled and were stopped at the Canadian side. I was brought back and interrogated by one woman and two male detectives from Oregon. I am not sure if I was Mirandized. There was no one that advocated for me in the room while I was being questioned. I have been here seven years with DOC rather than OYA. I age out of here in two months and hope I go to Salem, where I might have the friendship and protection of Chris Cringle, who is somewhat notorious … look him up. I can either give up or try and do something with my life. I took a lot, so I am trying to give back by having received a paralegal degree through Blackstone. My biological mother and stepdad were a very bad crowd. My stepfather was a scummy street person. I’ve been given two life sentences. — S.P., age 24 MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility, Woodburn, Oregon.

4. I’ve been here a week this time. I’m on court order to stay isolated from the other kids. I was in foster care for about 11 years and now I am adopted. They got me for residential burglary when I was in seventh grade, but since then it has been lots of probation violations — late for school, not appearing for my P.O., stuff like that. Drug Court probably saved my life. My mom is into drugs and my dad was deported to the Philippines. I have three sisters but we are all split up. The only person who visits me is my YMCA drug counselor. Lunch? It was junk. —C.C., age 16 Hale Ho’omalu Juvenile Hall, in downtown Oahu, Hawaii, built in the 1950s, now closed.

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6. Juveniles in the Challenge Program sit in their cells at the Juvenile Detention Facility, El Paso, Texas.

7. A female juvenile with scars from cutting herself that read “Fuck Me.” At Jan Evans Juvenile Justice Center, Reno, Nevada.

8. I’ve been here three days. I was charged with running away from a group home. And also larceny and seven more runaway charges. I took my mom’s car and then tried to evade police. So I got an assault. My dad lives with my stepmom — both are heavy drinkers. My dad is a construction worker. My stepmom takes all my dad’s attention. She’s an accountant. My mother gave up custody of me last year. She is schizo, bipolar with psychotic tendencies. She works at a hospital. The eye? I got into a fight with my girlfriend. She punched me so hard I went flying across the room and got a road rash on my shoulder. My eye looks a lot better now. I got hit two weeks ago. My girlfriend is a big track and volleyball player. She hit me because I used to have drug and alcohol problems. I said I would stop drinking, but I came into her house drunk. She lives with our best friend, E. She was living with her family, but they moved away and left her. I hope E’s mother will adopt me or at least be my guardian. Before this incident I got Bs and Cs in school. It is pretty difficult being gay and Christian in a land of homophobes. Actually it’s pretty impossible here. — A.B., age 14 Tulsa County Juvenile Detention Center, Oklahoma.

9. I been here for three years and ten months and haven’t been to trial yet. My mother tried to stab me and kill me when I was asleep so I ran out of the house. I’m here on 12 charges: two armed carjackings, armed robbery, armed burglary, eight burglary, sexual battery, and gang charges. I don’t blame nobody, I just made a mistake. I was 13. —R.F., age 17 Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center, Miami, Florida.

10. I’m here on medical transition from Miller Camp. I was there eight months. I’m in on three different second-degree robberies. My tats? I’m in the Fruit Town BRIMS (Black Revolutionary Independent Mafia Soldiers), part of the VNG (Van Ness Gangers). I want to go to Morehouse when I get out of here. —M.T., age 17 Central Juvenile Hall, Los Angeles, California.

Kansas City Shooting Is Hate of an Ancient Vintage

liberalsarecool:

Unfortunately, that spirit of community means nothing to a bigot with murder in his heart. He sees the word Jewish and the word shalom (peace), and that’s all he needs to know.

The gunman used a shotgun on a 14-year old and his grandfather at the JCC and killed a woman in a retirement home.

The hate in the right wing is getting out of hand. Where are the conservative leaders denouncing the killings? Where is the sensible tone from the Right looking for a change in violent rhetoric?

strangeasanjles:

the-fly-agaric:

caring more about animals than humans is not a sign of empathy, it is a way to distance yourself from problems that makes you uncomfortable.

when you talk about the treatment of animals and say “what if this was done to humans!?” remember that this was, or still is done to humans.

I have zero patience for people who prioritize Veganism over anti-racism and feminism

Exactly my stance.

(Source: the-fly-on-fire)

doemilk:

Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story. Lolita is not a love story.

And it was never intended to be one!!

(On a related note, “Every Breath You Take” is not intended to be a love song. For god’s sake don’t play it at your wedding. After a certain young age, an inability to understand who is the villain in a story should be embarrassing.)

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